Showing results for Enterprise Java (category)

JAX-RS: At ease with REST

Comments Off December 29th, 2009 by Henri Bezemer

In this post I will create a RESTful service using the JSR 311 JAX-RS implementation called Jersey on the GlassFish application server. This service will closely match the capabilities of the typical hello world demo. The focus of this post is to show how to develop a RESTful service with JAX-RS and Maven and how to deploy it on a J2EE application server like GlassFish. Read more…

Introduction

Apache ServiceMix is an Enterprise Service Bus that is compliant to the Java Business Integration specification (JBI). In a nutshell, the JBI specification defines a robust and managed environment which supports components called Binding Components (BC’s) and Service Engines (SE’s), that exchange XML messages (with optional binary attachments) with each other. The goal of a Binding Component is to convert messages to and from a specific protocol (like SOAP over HTTP) to allow communication with the outside world. The goal of a Service Engine is to provide business logic (like message transformation, message routing, or any other type of business logic). Read more…

Web services made easy with EJB, JPA and JAX-WS

Comments Off November 4th, 2009 by Henri Bezemer

In this post I will share some code and findings that came out of an experiment with EJB 3.0, JPA (included in EJB 3.0) and JAX-WS (Java API for XML-Based Web Services) 2.0. My goal was to create a useful layer of web services on top of a database with as little Java code as possible. I wasn’t sure if the three technologies could be mixed together in a thin layer without running into serious trouble, so I decided to create an example application and test it on three popular open source Java Application Servers: Geronimo (2.1.4), Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server (2.1) and JBoss (5.1.0 GA). I’m running these Application Servers on Sun JDK 6. Read more…

Upload a Java WebApp to Google App Engine

Comments Off October 9th, 2009 by Henri Bezemer

The Google App Engine supports the Sun Java Servlet Specification, together with a bunch of other standard and Google specific Java API’s (not including EJB). Google lets you run your Java webapp for free but with limited CPU time, bandwidth and number of requests per day. If one of these resources has been consumed your app will lock up for the rest of the day and respond only with HTTP code 403 ‘Forbidden’. If you need more you can pay for additional resources. The resource quota for a free account are more than adequate for a proof of concept. Read more…